Puppies

Allusion is neither an income, puppy producer or a commercial breeder. A quality Breeder that focuses on bettering the breed, having limited dogs and a small, private, breeding program. Pups or mature pups may be available from time to time. Allusion considers if pups are healthy, attractive show hopefuls and have the right temperament. From most recent litters a few pups are in the show ring now.
Show pups are loving pets too and available to very special homes.

OWN A CHAMPION
Mature pups or a young adult, that may have achieved their AKC championship title become available to special, forever homes as loving pets. These mature pups have been socialized, walk well on a lead, crate trained and are experienced travelers.

CONSIDER A MATURE PUP
A mature pup is 18 months and under averaging a year or less. When you want a new Frenchie without all the wee puppy concerns. When potty training, leash training, and being able to take your pup out around others, right away is important to you. Frenchies are very adaptable that can be shy and boisterous. Another benefit getting a mature puppy they are more aware and ready to listen to training and responding to praise. Their health and quality is more obvious. The younger the puppy the more vulnerable and fragile. Consider your puppy raised without the trial and error and can turn out to be the prefect companion.

AVAILABLE
RETIRED CHAMPION MALE, Under 4 years, dedicated companion, only male
* No Pups at this time *


TO INQUIRE ABOUT ALLUSION FRENCH BULLDOGS
Please review Prospective Buyers for ownership details.

(951) 677-4062 or Contact for more information.

Myths and Truths

Potential new puppy homes, some people are very specific about color, size, sex, and temperament. People are asking this of 8 to 10 week old pups? It is important to consider that you will be adding, a new member to your family for many years to come. When color, size, sex, or price become the main factor in choosing a puppy, may also keep you from getting a really great Frenchie. It can also prevent you from understanding the bigger picture. Frenchies are not perfect and as much as parents wish that of their own children. If you decide to contact a commercial breeder or broker, they can find your selection through a network of puppy mills and agents, be it imported, rescued or traded and then sold to you. You hear what you want but really, NOT! What you may get at eight weeks could turn out completely different at six months and even two years. Go to www.akc.org or www.frenchbulldogclub.org and look up the French Bulldog standard or on this web site and study it. What you don't understand when you meet or consider a Frenchie to purchase, is more obvious about the quality, of the dog and what the breed should look like.

Smaller Frenchies, if you have been told the smaller ones are rare and hard to find could be true. Typically a very small Frenchie, runt, dwarf, whatever, can have serious health or structural issues contributing to their stunted size. Very short backed Frenchies may be more at risk for spinal issues. At one time smaller sized Frenchies, around 15 pounds were more recognized, however breeding compromised the quality of their spines, structures and health. X-raying young pups may indicate "potential" problems that may change for the better, get worse, or just stay the same. Eight weeks of age is not likely a Breeder knows for certain of a dwarf, if the pup will live a long and healthy life, much less survive the future months. Be careful of what you're getting - a lot of potential is not all good.

What health concerns are present..? For a Breeder the weaning process at 4 - 6 weeks, can seem like the litter is taking two steps backwards and going in all different directions. New baby digestion reacting to new foods, like proteins and fats are not always a smooth transition. There are benefits to obtaining an older puppy and should be worth more to you. Between four and ten months old, they are more ready to listen, understand training and can be out, and about socializing with you,and friends. Teething is another milestone, at between four to six months a pup will chew on everything during that time and beyond. I would purchase a six month old pup quicker than a eight week old pup, and be better aware of what I was getting.

Make sure you are dealing with an honest, ethical, and reputable breeder that will disclose their knowledge about their pups to you. More often than not people buy Frenchies from Breeders that can't or are not honest about the facts. If you don't know to ask, you won't know.


About Puppies

Pups take on their own characteristics, personalities and features individually, distinct. It is very tough to determine the outcome of some breeds. This is why some breeders hang on to the pups a long time.  Sometimes there are more than one type in a litter. By watching the pups develop, enables the breeder to make better informed decisions in the future. However a pup may show no signs of issue at a young age, yet turn out to have NO issues later.

Single pup litters, it seems you get more attached. The pup tends to learn quicker when receiving all the attention. A single pup litter cost almost as much as a litter of five to produce. The difference is the cost of one pup for having dew claws removed, shots and food. Pet puppies cost the same as show prospects to produce, there is no difference between the two until they are placed as future producers or to affluent clients and handlers with great expectations. The sire stud fee makes a different. The quality of the dam and the breeder's reputation can turn a good litter into a great litter.

Breeding and producing pups, means there are several milestones to over come before the actual outcome of the pups are known. Wonder why Frenchies are so expensive, as the breeder it is easy to realize. The whole process from beginning to end takes about six months.

  1. Selecting the dam and sire
  2. Testing and breeding the pair successfully (Artificial Insemination or A.I.)
  3. Verifying the mother is pregnant and preparation
  4. Whelping the litter that is done by C-Section
  5. The mother surviving the surgery
  6. Pups surviving outside of the mother
  7. Responding to birth defects and sudden death
  8. Getting the pups home to a warm whelping area
  9. The mother's milk available and nourishing
  10. Helping the pups to nurse for the first time
  11. Tube or bottle feeding as necessary
  12. Pup surviving the first few days
  13. Mother cleans and cares for her pups
  14. Pups not exposed to germs causing illness and dehydration
  15. Pups gaining weight
  16. Pups eyes opening
  17. Pups getting on their feet
  18. Pups ears going up
  19. Pups teeth coming in
  20. Weaning the pups
    1. Selecting the right diet
    2. Stopping mother's milk
    3. Continued weight gain
    4. Healthy stools
  21. Registering the litter with AKC
  22. Play time and holding the pups
  23. Paper potty tray training
  24. Vaccinations
  25. Finding the right home
  26. Exposure to the outside world
  27. Growing the pups and training
  28. Taking care for a long healthy life

Breeding, an out-cross litter there are no references since there are no relationships between the parents or their backgrounds. The breeder maybe delighted or disappointed with the pups produced. In a litter that is related on both sides to the background of the parents, assumptions are made based on the history of dogs produced. The dog's parents and their parents, finished their championships prior to breeding and may take several years to accomplish, and to realize the stability of their health. Many people breed to what they have, other times breed to something known or even unfamiliar histories.

You will not find pups sold in pet stores from quality breeders. You may wonder why Frenchie pups cost so much, it makes more sense to pay more from a quality, breeder than from an importer or pet store - keep that in mind. And, a quality breeder will provide a limited health guarantee for replacement and support for you and your new puppy.

Brokers, arrange to place or sell dogs from other breeders. In short the middle man and go between sometimes having nothing or very litte to do with the process. They don't breed or whelp the pups, the breeders they get pups from do all the work. They are very much like importers except perhaps may deal with a specific set of breeders that will enable them, to place their dogs for a higher price and benefit their own interests. When you have an issue with your puppy, your relationship may be with that broker having little knowledge of the pups.

For the finer things, buy direct from a reputable source.


Inquiries please be specific - Prospective buyers.

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